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Whitestone street reamed for late St. Luke’s pastor

The street in front of St. Luke’s Church in Whitestone now bears the name of the man who led the parish since 2005.
Member of the Knights of Columbus, who pushed for the renaming, were on hand for the unveiling of “Monsignor John Tosi Way” last Friday on Clintonville Street at Locke Avenue.
Councilman Paul Vallone sponsored the renaming, and State Senator John Liu, Assemblyman Ed Braunstein and Borough President Donovan Richards joined the councilman at the ceremony.
“It can be a little intimidating to think that I am going to be the pastor on Monsignor John Tosi Way,” said Tosi’s successor, Father John Costello. “Not Monsignor John Tosi Street, not Monsignor John Tosi Avenue, Monsignor John Tosi Way.
“Those of you who know and love Monsignor Tosi know his way could be a little daunting,” he added. “But as pastor, at the very bottom of his heart Monsignor John Tosi’s way was the way of Jesus. So that’s what I hope to model when I see that sign.”
Tosi was born in Flushing and attended St. Ann’s School, Monsignor McClancy High School, Cathedral College in Douglaston and Immaculate Conception Seminary.
He was ordained a priest in 1973 and named a monsignor in 1997. He passed away last May due to a heart condition.
Tosi also spent time at Our Lady of Grace in Howard Beach, Resurrection Ascension in Rego Park, and as rector of St. James Cathedral in Downtown Brooklyn.
During his tenure at the 151-year-old St. Luke’s, Tosi made many renovations to the Queens parish based on his experiences with the Diocesan Liturgical Commission. In Whitestone, he also joined the local Knights of Columbus.
“Once we heard of Monsignor Tosi’s passing, we put our heads together thinking, ‘how can we memorialize him,’” said grand knight Enrico Urgo.
Also on hand for the renaming was Tosi’s sister, Susan Zaretti, and her husband John.
“I really, really appreciate all the love shown to him while he was here,” she told the parishioners gathered for the event. “You treated him like family and he loved this place so much.”

Borough Hall dubbed ‘One Claire Shulman Way’

When Claire Shulman passed away last August at the age of 94, Queens lost one of its greatest advocates. However, the legacy of the borough’s trailblazing first female borough president continues to live on and inspire.
This past Monday, Borough President Donovan Richards presided over a ceremony unveiling “One Claire Shulman Way” as the vanity address of Borough Hall.
“Claire Shulman was a larger-than-life figure who consistently defied expectations with her uncanny ability to get things done for the people of Queens,” said Richards. “Her death last year was a huge loss to all of us who relied on her friendship and counsel, but we keep her legacy and memory alive by permanently and prominently affixing her name to Queens Borough Hall.
“From now on, everyone who visits the people’s house will see the name of Claire Shulman and reflect on the great work she did to build a better Queens,” he added.
Shulman was one of the first people to get behind Richards’ campaign for borough president.
“Claire Shulman was my unofficial campaign manager,” Richards said. “I can’t believe she supported me.”
Shulman served as Borough President from 1986 until 2002, and played a role in a wide range of issues.
Her accomplishments included the rezoning of dozens of neighborhoods to curb overdevelopment, expanding the borough’s infrastructure, and increasing funding to senior citizen centers, cultural programs and libraries.
“She expected a lot out of me and she expected a lot out of everyone,” explained Larry Schulman, the son of the late borough president. “She could not give up the task of making Queens a better place.”
Former borough president and current Queens district attorney Melinda Katz echoed similar sentiments.
“Claire was a loving person, there was no doubt about it, but she was tough,” said Katz. “I am proud of the years I had working under her and the years I had working with her.”
Taking part in the ceremony were former borough president Sharron Lee and City Council members Karen Koslowitz and Barry Grodenchik.
“There is B.C. Queens and A.C. Queens, before Claire Shulman and after Claire Shulman” said Grodenchik. “There is not a single neighborhood she didn’t touch.”

Borough Hall dubbed ‘One Claire Shulman Way’

When Claire Shulman passed away last August at the age of 94, Queens lost one of its greatest advocates. However, the legacy of the borough’s trailblazing first female borough president continues to live on and inspire.
This past Monday, Borough President Donovan Richards presided over a ceremony unveiling “One Claire Shulman Way” as the vanity address of Borough Hall.
“Claire Shulman was a larger-than-life figure who consistently defied expectations with her uncanny ability to get things done for the people of Queens,” said Richards. “Her death last year was a huge loss to all of us who relied on her friendship and counsel, but we keep her legacy and memory alive by permanently and prominently affixing her name to Queens Borough Hall.
“From now on, everyone who visits the people’s house will see the name of Claire Shulman and reflect on the great work she did to build a better Queens,” he added.
Shulman was one of the first people to get behind Richards’ campaign for borough president.
“Claire Shulman was my unofficial campaign manager,” Richards said. “I can’t believe she supported me.”
Shulman served as Borough President from 1986 until 2002, and played a role in a wide range of issues.
Her accomplishments included the rezoning of dozens of neighborhoods to curb overdevelopment, expanding the borough’s infrastructure, and increasing funding to senior citizen centers, cultural programs and libraries.
“She expected a lot out of me and she expected a lot out of everyone,” explained Larry Schulman, the son of the late borough president. “She could not give up the task of making Queens a better place.”
Former borough president and current Queens district attorney Melinda Katz echoed similar sentiments.
“Claire was a loving person, there was no doubt about it, but she was tough,” said Katz. “I am proud of the years I had working under her and the years I had working with her.”
Taking part in the ceremony were former borough president Sharron Lee and City Council members Karen Koslowitz and Barry Grodenchik.
“There is B.C. Queens and A.C. Queens, before Claire Shulman and after Claire Shulman” said Grodenchik. “There is not a single neighborhood she didn’t touch.”

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