Influencer eats her way through New York

Bria Braithwaite engages 100K+ audience, supports restaurant industry

By Jessica Meditz

[email protected]

Braithwaite recently hit 100,000 followers on her Instagram page, @goodeatsonlynyc.

With her iPhone, ring light and zest for life, Brooklyn-based influencer, Bria Braithwaite, strives to engage her audience and support the local restaurant industry.

Braithwaite, 29, who’s a resident of Bed-Stuy, runs @goodeatsonlynyc on Instagram and @briotchhh on TikTok, where she has 102k and 31.8k followers, respectively.

Originally from Wisconsin, Braithwaite relocated to Jamaica, Queens to attend St. John’s University, where she studied communication with a focus on marketing and business.

Braithwaite works in finance full-time, but says that her lifelong passion for food made her decision to become an influencer fairly easy.

“I’m not just a foodie, I do work full time, too…so being able to take my hobby and kind of put it on such a pedestal has been super exciting,” she said. “I basically eat my way through New York and offer recommendations to anybody in the tri-state area or looking to visit and have some good food.”

Braithwaite’s account, @goodeatsonlynyc, has a colorful and engaging feed.

One of the things she loves the most about being a foodie is the fact that she’s always on her toes, ready to try a new cuisine or restaurant and share that sentiment with her audience.

Braithwaite visits a variety of community staples throughout Brooklyn and Queens, as well as the Bronx, Manhattan and New Jersey, to name a few, to highlight small businesses and hidden gems.

“I would definitely say that I like to seek out new experiences in flavor. My end goal is to always find new, innovative or emerging restaurants that I feel would pair well with my audience. I’m always trying to think outside the box or go to places that I would 100 percent recommend…places that I would go to on the daily,” she said.

Braithwaite also understands that many people are picky eaters, and she strives to make her content accessible and enjoyable for everyone. She also adores the fact that this career allows her to be adventurous.

“I do try to find some simple eats in conjunction with some things that maybe people don’t eat on a regular basis…so kind of bridging the gap between people who are looking to explore, but may not be as adventurous, so they can kind of dip their feet in a little bit,” she said.

Braithwaite definitely feels the support of her large audience, as she grew quickly since she started her Instagram account in February of this year.

“I remember when I first posted, I just thought it might be a little bit challenging to kind of conquer Instagram, understand the algorithm and how things work,” she recalled. “But everything kind of worked in my favor, and it just took off.”

In fact, she actually started her influencing journey on TikTok, which began with casual posting and something just for fun. However, one of her first TikTok videos went viral, inspiring her to keep going.

Braithwaite strongly feels that local restaurants are the heart and soul of our communities, and said that she takes pride in being able to give many restaurant owners and small businesses exposure through her content.

“Throughout the journey, I’ve met so many other foodies, and so many different restaurant owners and businesses within that realm. My focus in finding a lot of hidden gems that are small businesses now is more of paying it forward, because I’m so appreciative of their support,” she said. “Because those are the restaurants that I would frequent in my neighborhood or that I always wanted to try, and then I got the opportunity to put them on a platform, giving them more visibility and exposure, is just really nice,” she continued.

Restaurants highlight Hispanic culture in Queens

Hispanic Heritage Month ran from September 15-October 15, and although the festivities are ending, businesses around Queens are proving that it’s never too late to celebrate Hispanic culture.
Take for example Asadero La Fogata, which is located at 108-40 Corona Ave right in the heart of Corona. The Colombian restaurant is owned by Andrea Rendon, who aims to serve dishes that make people feel like they are at home.
“I think the way we make the food is the way we make people feel like they are in Colombia,” said Rendon.
Rendon was born in Colombia, but has lived in Queens for the past 27 years. Her older sister was the inspiration driving her to open a restaurant.
“Ever since I came to America, I have always worked in restaurants and I started working with my sister,” said Rendon. “She works hard and she has her own restaurant. She showed me that any woman can do anything when they work hard.”
There are many other great eats within walking distance from Asadero La Fogata. Primos Bakery at 47-20 Junction Boulevard serves up delicious treats that are made on the premises. Primos Bakery is owned by Ignacio Lucero and his cousin, Yaco Rincón.
“We’ve been in business for five years,” said Lucero. “We first started with the warehouse and selling wholesale, then we opened the storefront.”
Lucero also delivers bread to stores and restaurants in the surrounding area.
Primos’ must-buy pastry is the “conchas,” a well-known baked good popular in Mexico. Additionally, Primos sells handmade bags, keychains, and clothing right outside the store every Thursday to Sunday from 4 to 9 p.m. All the items on sale come straight from Mexico.

Serve your server

Dear Editor,
In these difficult economic times, it is especially important to patronize your favorite restaurants and honor the employees who make them a success.
Now that more of us have received our COVID-19 vaccine, why not join me in celebrating National Waiter and Waitress Day on May 21.
As regular patrons of several local restaurants, including Aunt Bella’s, Joe’s Marathon Food Shop and King Wok in Little Neck and Fontana Famous Gyro and Pizza in Bayside, there are several ways to say thank you.
Let your servers, cooks and owners know how much you appreciate the excellent food and service.
We try to tip 20 percent against the total bill, including taxes. If it is an odd amount, round up to the next dollar. Why not leave a 25 percent tip in honor of this day?
If you can afford to eat out, you can afford an extra dollar tip. When ordering take out, don’t forget to leave a dollar or two for the waiter or cook. Trust us, it is appreciated.
The people who work at your favorite restaurant are our neighbors. They work long hours for little pay and count on tips, which make up a significant portion of their income.
If we don’t patronize our local restaurants, they don’t eat either. Your purchases keep our neighbors employed and the local economy growing.
As a show of appreciation, drop off a box of candy, cookies or some other treat for your favorite waiter or restaurant staff to celebrate this day.
Sincerely,
Larry Penner
Great Neck

75 percenters

Dear Editor,
The announcement by Governor Andrew Cuomo that restaurants in New York City will be allowed to expand indoor dining capacity to 75 percent is the best news that could possibly be given to the thousands of restaurant owners throughout the city.
This will mean that more employees who were laid off when the pandemic forced restaurants to close can now be rehired, which will be another positive sign that the restaurant industry is starting to rebound.
Restaurants are so vital to the city’s economy. This increase was long overdue.
Sincerely,
John Amato
Fresh Meadows

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