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City’s precincts host National Night Out events

The 76 police precincts in New York City celebrated National Night Out Against Crime on August 3. The nationwide program is meant to help police departments forge relationships with the communities they serve.
Sixteen precincts in Queens organized events in parks and public spaces throughout the borough, including an event in Sunnyside’s Lou Lodati Park organized by the 108th Precinct.
“This is a great way to show our care for the community,” said Colin Hicks, a volunteer from the Queens District Attorney’s office. “I think [Queens District Attorney] Melinda Katz says it really well. She doesn’t want your first interaction with her to be when you are in trouble.”
“It’s nice for everyone to see the police officers,” said Joanna Carbona, a volunteer with the 108th Precinct. “Officers also give out their numbers so people can access them more easily. Not all of the information is online, so it’s easier to just grab numbers right now.”
Maspeth and Middle Village Councilman Robert Holden attended multiple Night Out events in Queens. He spoke about the importance of police work and community engagement.
“This is very important, now more than ever with crime on the rise,” Holden said. “It’s good to remind people that police are a partner to the community.”

City’s precincts host National Night Out events

The 76 police precincts in New York City celebrated National Night Out Against Crime on August 3. The nationwide program is meant to help police departments forge relationships with the communities they serve.
Sixteen precincts in Queens organized events in parks and public spaces throughout the borough, including an event in Sunnyside’s Lou Lodati Park organized by the 108th Precinct.
“This is a great way to show our care for the community,” said Colin Hicks, a volunteer from the Queens District Attorney’s office. “I think [Queens District Attorney] Melinda Katz says it really well. She doesn’t want your first interaction with her to be when you are in trouble.”
“It’s nice for everyone to see the police officers,” said Joanna Carbona, a volunteer with the 108th Precinct. “Officers also give out their numbers so people can access them more easily. Not all of the information is online, so it’s easier to just grab numbers right now.”
Maspeth and Middle Village Councilman Robert Holden attended multiple Night Out events in Queens. He spoke about the importance of police work and community engagement.
“This is very important, now more than ever with crime on the rise,” Holden said. “It’s good to remind people that police are a partner to the community.”

National Grid to raise rates for NYC customers

The New York Department of Public Service and National Grid filed a joint proposal that would increase energy rates for approximately 1.9 million customers in Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and parts of Long Island.
The agreement would raise bills by an average of $5.56 per month in 2021, and then by $4.89 per month in 2022.
The increase would finance the construction of the highly controversial North Brooklyn Pipeline, as well as other projects in the outer boroughs.
The news comes after two years of negotiations between National Grid and the Department of Public Service amid constant protests against the pipeline project.
Despite the criticism, National Grid holds that the new construction will allow for a safer, more reliable, and more efficient gas supply. vironmental Protection Committee to pitch the pipeline project.
The project would install a new gas pipeline underneath parts of Brownsville, Greenpoint, Bedford-Stuyvesant, and Williamsburg. Detractors argue that the pipeline would pollute the ground and water of multiple communities of color and low-income communities, as well as further the city’s dependence on fossil fuels.
Groups such as the Sane Energy Project have opposed National Grid at every step during the pipeline approval process.
“This project is not a replacement of leaking pipelines, it is an expansion to charge us, the rate-payers, millions of dollars in rate hikes to fill their shareholders pockets,” reads the Sane Energy Project’s mission statement. “Our goal is to stop this project and push Governor Cuomo to mandate that our Public Service Commission invests our rate-payer dollars in renewable energy and efficiency that is affordable and accessible to all New Yorkers regardless of income or zip code.”
The New York Department of Public Service must hold evidentiary hearings to approve its agreement with National Grid, during which it will collect statements of opposition and support. The hearings are tentatively scheduled for July and August.

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