Free concert and car show attract crowds at Atlas Park

By Stephanie Meditz

[email protected]

White Wedding, mostly an ‘80s cover band, treated Atlas Park to their ‘90s set.

On Tuesday, The Shops at Atlas Park took the Glendale community back in time with a ‘90s concert and classic car show.

While cover band “White Wedding” performed hits from back in the day in the penultimate show of Atlas Park’s Concerts on the Green series, volunteers from the East Coast Car Association displayed their vintage vehicles.

Although White Wedding is mostly an ‘80s cover band, the evening’s setlist consisted of ‘90s sensations, including Britney Spears, The Spice Girls, Sublime and Alanis Morissette.

The band also dressed for the occasion, decked out in flannel shirts and Dr. Martens boots.

Emily McNamara belted all the ‘90s girl power anthems.

Although the members of White Wedding come from different states on the east coast, they frequently perform in New York.

White Wedding was voted “Best Cover Band in the Boro” of Queens for the third year in a row.

“We play in Queens, we play New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, all around the tri-state area,” David Artiaga, front vocalist of White Wedding, said.

In July, the band performed their ‘80s set at Juniper Valley Park.

Artiaga, whose voice effortlessly resembled those of numerous ‘90s icons, has never formally studied music.

“I was just born with talent,” he joked. “Never had a lesson in my life, and it just seemed to work out.”

Emily McNamara, also a front vocalist for White Wedding, has been involved in theater for most of her life.

“It’s a good group. Everyone brings a good piece,” Artiaga said.

White Wedding plays private parties, corporate events and weddings throughout the tri-state area.

For bookings, email [email protected] or visit www.whiteweddingband.com.

The band is also on Instagram (@whiteweddingband) and Twitter (@whitewedding80s).

While the ‘90s music played, the East Coast Car Association held a classic car show in the parking lot at Atlas Park.

Harold Mecabe promotes the East Coast Car Association’s 24th annual toy drive in November.

Established in 1999 by Eddie Walter, the East Coast Car Association hosts car shows and cruise nights to raise money for St. Mary’s Children’s Hospital in Bayside.

Harold Mecabe, master of ceremony, has been involved with the club for 22 years.

After Walter passed away in 2007, he and other members unanimously decided to continue to support St. Mary’s Children’s Hospital to honor Walter’s legacy.

“We have a handful of members in the club, and all the people here support us,” Mecabe said. “They know what we do and they help us. Without those people, we would actually be nothing…And we will continue doing what we’re doing as long as we possibly can.”

In November, the club will host its 24th annual toy run.

“We will leave from the Forest Park bandshell area. The NYPD will shut down the Jackie Robinson Highway, the Grand Central Parkway and the Clearview Expressway to give us direct access to St. Mary’s Hospital,” Mecabe said. “At that time, we will present whatever proceeds that we collect during the course of the year to St. Mary’s.”

The East Coast Car Association has raised over $250,000 and $40,000 worth of toys since it was founded.

The club has hosted two car shows at Atlas Park this summer, both of which occurred on the same night as a concert.

Among the classic cars displayed was a 1979 Buick Riviera.

“It was just coordinated that way, which is good because it brings out more people,” Mecabe said.

To join or donate to the East Coast Car Association, visit their website at https://eccatoysfortots.org.

The Shops at Atlas Park has hosted its annual Concerts on the Green series since 2013.

General manager Peter DeLucia has found that the concerts not only show people all that Atlas Park has to offer, but also provide a fun, free night out for the neighborhood.

“It’s just a way to engage the community,” he said. “Have them come out, see what we’ve got going on at Atlas Park, like the roller skating rink and some of the new stores.”

The concert, as well as other concerts and movie nights at Atlas Park, was sponsored by Main Street Radiology.

Surgey Santiago, a marketing agent from Main Street Radiology, said that these events are great opportunities to inform the community about the essential services offered, such as X-rays, ultrasounds and MRIs.

“Since we sponsor The Shops at Atlas Park, we’ll give knowledge about the facility and what we do,” she said. “We just want to attract the neighborhood, let them know that we’re here.”

Main Street Radiology recently opened a fifth location on Cooper Avenue in Glendale, right down the street from Atlas Park.

Knights of Columbus hosts drive for Kentucky floods

By Jessica Meditz

[email protected]

Bill Kuil, Don Gander, Ken Engesser, Aiden O’Callaghan, Gerry O’Callaghan, Sal Laurenzano helped collect items for the catastrophic floods in Kentucky.

Although Kentucky is hundreds of miles away from New York City, distance didn’t stop local Knights of Columbus councils from helping folks in need.

The Knights of Columbus of Msgr. Sherman Council No. 5103 in Glendale organized a drive to help the victims of the catastrophic floods in Kentucky.

At the end of July, eastern Kentucky as well as parts of Missouri, Illinois, Virginia, West Virginia and the Las Vegas Valley experienced severe floods over a week-long span.

At least 39 people died as a result of the flooding in Kentucky, and countless people lost their homes and all their belongings.

In an effort to provide relief, the Knights of Columbus collected items in high demand, such as nonperishable food, cleaning supplies, water jugs and hand sanitizer.

The Knights of Columbus will make the trip down to Kentucky on Tuesday.

They held a series of drop-offs at the Council this week and the one prior, and will load up a truck to transport the items to Kentucky themselves, making the 11-hour drive next Tuesday.

The Council received close to $10,000 between cash and nonperishable supplies for the people that need support from the flooding.

A total of four trucks among Council No. 5103 and other councils across Queens and Brooklyn will combine their donations and drop them off to a Knights of Columbus connection they’ve made in Kentucky.

They also received donations from parishioners of Sacred Heart of Glendale.

Past Grand Knight Gerry O’Callaghan said that this is not the first time the Knights of Columbus have helped their friends across state lines, in fact, he participated in relief efforts for New Bern, N.C. when the city experienced severe floods.

“When we had Hurricane Ida, the people we helped out in New Bern and in Texas immediately called up and said, ‘What do you guys need?’ For me, it was a chance to give back because when we needed help as a community in New York, they came to help us,” he said.

Other members of the council simply feel it is their duty and calling to help people in need.

“When asked why we’re doing this, I refer to the watch words of the Knights of Columbus, ‘If not us, then who?’ That’s why everybody gets so involved,” said Deputy Grand Knight Sal Laurenzano.

Locals take control of their health

Last weekend, men ages 45 and up had the opportunity to take control of their health and get tested for prostate cancer.

On July 24, Mount Sinai’s Robert F. Smith Prostate Cancer Screening Mobile Unit was stationed at The Shops at Atlas Park, located at 8000 Cooper Avenue in Glendale.

Mount Sinai partnered with NYS Senator Joseph Addabbo to bring the hospital’s free PSA blood tests into the community.

This free screening was available to men who have never been previously diagnosed and treated for prostate cancer, whether or not they have health insurance.

“As men age it is vitally important that they take care of their prostate health through annual exams because if something is wrong, it is essential to catch prostate cancer early,” Addabbo said.

“Prostate cancer is one of the deadliest cancers in the U.S. and early detection is key to combating this illness. After the pandemic our previous provider of prostate cancer screenings went out of business so it took us some time to bring this service back to the community,” he continued. “I want to thank Mount Sinai and Atlas Park for their partnership in this event and for working with my team to set up this important free health screening for men across the district.”

Women will also have the chance to advocate for their health, through a free Mammogram Screening service in Maspeth.

On Wednesday, August 3, the American-Italian Cancer Foundation will have their Mammogram Bus located outside of the Maspeth Federal Savings Bank branch located at 56-18 69th Street, in Maspeth from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. to provide free mammogram screenings to women who register for the event through Addabbo’s office.

In order to be eligible for the clinical breast exam, women must be between 40 and 79 years old with health insurance, or between 50 and 79 years old without health insurance.

They must currently live in New York City, and have not had a mammogram in the last 12 months.

Uninsured patients are welcome, there are no co-payments, and all deductibles are waived for this service.

Although registration is preferred, walk-ins will be accommodated on a limited basis.

Addabbo encourages residents to call his office at (718) 738-1111 or the American-Italian Cancer Foundation at 1-877-628-9090 to secure their appointment.

Police impersonation, home invasion, robbery on Doran Ave.

Perp got away with $10K, still at large

By Jessica Meditz

[email protected]

Photo: Google Maps

A home invasion and robbery occurred Saturday at around 1 a.m. on Doran Ave. in Glendale, police say.

A 27-year-old female victim reported that two unidentified males, one of them wearing an NYPD t-shirt, ballistic vest, and a baseball cap, rang her doorbell looking for her boyfriend, claiming they were NYPD officers before kicking in the door and handcuffed her.

The individuals displayed a firearm and forcibly entered the residence.

The 104th Precinct shared these photos of the suspects and vehicles involved.

Police say the suspects removed $10,000 cash and fled in a black Ford Mustang and dark colored Nissan crossover model.

Upon arrival, officers encountered the woman standing in the street, handcuffed. She did not sustain any injuries as a result of this crime.

At the time of publication, no arrests have been made in regard to this incident and the investigation is ongoing.

Residents of the neighborhood remain concerned about the motive of the crime, and what the recent uptick in crime means for the community in the long term.

“Who leaves $10,000 on their night table? If that’s true, I’m going to assume the burglary was drug-related,” Kathy Masi, a Glendale resident and member of Community Board 5, said.

“Unfortunately, due to bail reform we are seeing large spikes in crime throughout the city and right here locally in our neighborhood,” Michael Conigliaro, a Rego Park resident and the Republican candidate for the upcoming State Assembly District 28 election, said.

“Police officers risk their lives each day they put on their uniform and under the current flawed criminal justice system, criminals are released after an arrest without any fear of repercussions of committing the same crime again,” he continued. “This is unacceptable and needs to stop.”

Assault suspect still at large

No arrests have been made

Two women were physically assaulted on June 16, along Myrtle Avenue in the vicinity of the Glendale Library.

One of the victims—a 33-year-old woman, who requested to remain anonymous—said that a man punched her in the back of the head and shortly thereafter, punched another woman in the head and attempted to push her into the street.

A male witness working at a garage for Mount Lebanon Cemetery stayed with the women until the police arrived.

The Glendale Register ran a story last week describing the attacks, and at the time of publication, did not have an image of the suspect or information about him.

Since then, an employee of the cemetery posted a photo of the suspect that was captured by surveillance footage.

Christina Wilkinson, a member of Juniper Park Civic Association, promptly forwarded the image to Councilman Robert Holden, who then sent it to Cooper Rapid Rehousing Center.

The shelter confirmed that the individual was a resident of the shelter at the time of the assaults, but left on June 26.

The 33-year-old victim said that after searching for the perpetrator in the surrounding area and being unable to locate him, officers from the 104 Precinct took their statements, and a photo of the suspect from the cemetery’s security footage.

No arrests have been made in regards to this incident, and the victim feels “blown off” by the cops.

“It felt like the detective that I spoke to a few days later was blowing me off. He didn’t seem to know about the security footage, even though both of the officers who responded saw it, and I believe one of them took a picture with his cell phone,” she previously told The Glendale Register. “It just kind of felt like nobody was going to do anything about it, or that it wasn’t an ‘important crime,’ like a ‘there are bigger fish to fry’ type of thing.

In a Facebook post to the Glendale Civic Association group, Wilkinson said that Deputy Inspector Kevin Coleman, the 104’s new commanding officer, had not seen the photo of the suspect that was posted online.

Her post also says that the officers claim there were no witnesses, and that they’d been looking for the security camera footage of the attacks.

“Since they collected the screenshot, if the police followed up with the shelter that day, they could have arrested that man,” Wilkinson said. “I think what [Holden] was most upset about was that we used to get notified by Community Affairs that a pattern was occurring and to be alert, but we’re not getting that anymore.”

She brought up the recent robbery pattern across neighborhoods in Queens, one of which happened on 80th Street and Cooper Avenue in Glendale—where an elderly man was shoved to the ground and his gold chain was removed by two individuals on a moped.

“The civic groups have been very upset lately because the communication has been lackluster coming from the precincts,” Wilkinson said. “We find out about crimes in the newspaper or on TV that are happening in our own neighborhood, and we feel that there needs to be better communication from the precinct.”

The assault victim said that she’s lived in Glendale for most of her life, and has never felt unsafe—but is now on high alert when she goes out.

“I feel like there’s somebody still out there who maybe is looking to harm people or possibly doesn’t even remember harming people, depending on what his situation is,” she said. “I almost feel like nothing’s going to happen unless he does something again.”
Wilkinson feels that the homeless shelter is actively harming Glendale and its surrounding neighborhoods.

“It’s just been a revolving door of people who really need to be monitored, and they’re not,” she said. “Most of them don’t even know where they are, so they’re wandering around performing crimes of opportunity. Many of them have mental health or substance abuse issues… I don’t know why anybody would think this would be something that would enhance the community rather than be a detriment.”

Two women assaulted in Glendale

Perpetrator still on the loose

On June 16 at around 12:30 p.m., two women were physically assaulted on Myrtle Avenue in Glendale.

A 33-year-old woman, who requested to remain anonymous, said that during her regular lunchtime walk, an unknown individual came up from behind and punched her in the back of the head.

The incident occurred on Myrtle Avenue across the street from Mount Lebanon Cemetery, near the Glendale Library.

“It wasn’t my first thought that somebody had hit me,” she said. “I thought maybe something had fallen from the roof or some kids were playing with a basketball—almost like something had been thrown at me very hard.”

Instead, a male bystander working at a garage for the cemetery told her, “That man just punched you in the head.”
In the distance, she could see the perpetrator walking away casually in the opposite direction.

A few moments after the male bystander allowed the woman to come into the garage to call 9-1-1, another woman pushing a child in a stroller approached them, visibly shaken up.

“The man I was with said to her, ‘Did he hit you, too?’ and she said, ‘Yes, he punched me in the head and tried to push me into the street,’” the woman said.

“At that point, I was still kind of on autopilot trying to explain to 9-1-1 what the situation was. After we hung up and the police were on the way, I started to get upset and was processing what was actually going on,” she continued. “I could still see [the perpetrator] walking in the distance, continuing down Myrtle Avenue toward the McDonald’s.”

She added that the other woman who was assaulted said she was afraid to walk home as she needed to go in the same direction.

The two women, the child in the stroller, and the male bystander waited together outside the garage for the police to arrive.

But before they did, the suspect approached them again, yelling nonsensical statements and threatening them.

“We ran inside the garage and hid inside a tiny office in there. There was a glass window, so we can kind of see him outside,” the woman said.

“He was looking inside the garage for us, and at that point I felt like something was really wrong,” she continued. “It felt more like he intended to hurt us the second time, because why else would you come back? It was very menacing.”

By the time the police arrived, the suspect was gone, and they searched the surrounding area for him for a few minutes.

The cops could not locate him, and took the two victims’ statements.

Although the cemetery’s security cameras were able to capture a clear image of the suspect, the woman said that “nothing has been done” by the police as far as her case goes.

“It felt like the detective that I spoke to a few days later was blowing me off. He didn’t seem to know about the security footage, even though both of the officers who responded saw it, and I believe one of them took a picture with his cell phone,” she said.

“It’s been well over two weeks now, and I haven’t heard anything back. As far as I know, nobody’s been caught, and the picture hasn’t been circulated anywhere,” she continued. “It just kind of felt like nobody was going to do anything about it, or that it wasn’t an ‘important crime,’ like a ‘there are bigger fish to fry’ type of thing.

The woman described the assailant as a Black male in his mid-to-late 20s, average-size, wearing an oversized black t-shirt, a black durag, and what appeared to be red headphones around his neck.

She said that he looked very unassuming, and would not think twice if she’d simply passed him on the street.

It is unclear whether or not the individual was mentally unwell or under the influence of a substance, or if he came from the nearby Cooper Rapid Rehousing Center, a 200-bed men’s homeless shelter, which has caused a stir in the community.

“A lot of people that I’ve told the story to seem to think he came from there… I feel a lot of compassion for people who are experiencing homelessness, and was kind of an idealist when the shelter was first opening up,” the woman said.
“If this person was from the homeless shelter, I just hope he gets whatever help he needs.”

Since being assaulted, the 33-year-old Glendale resident said that she worries about the individual hurting someone else, and now feels very unsafe in the neighborhood.

“I’ve lived in Glendale pretty much my entire life, and I’ve never felt unsafe—especially in the middle of the day walking around. Now I feel like I’m constantly on high alert, and I’m afraid to go too far from my home or from my office,” she said. “I had a routine where I would walk on my lunch break and after work. A lot of times, I would go for a longer walk around the neighborhood, maybe an hour or so. I don’t feel comfortable doing that anymore.”

“I feel like there’s somebody still out there who maybe is looking to harm people or possibly doesn’t even remember harming people, depending on what his situation is,” she added. “The fact that he came back to us like that… that’s the kind of crime that can escalate. That’s the part that’s most concerning to me, and I almost feel like nothing’s going to happen unless he does something again.”

The NYPD’s Deputy Commissioner of Public Information confirmed that no arrests have been made at the time of publication, and the investigation is ongoing.

WellLife Network brings affordable housing to Glendale

Housing for homeless, income-eligible folks

After years of planning, vying for community support, and construction, WellLife Network finally cut the ribbon on a brand new five-story affordable apartment complex in Glendale.

Dedicated to serving people across the five boroughs and Long Island with developmental disabilities or mental illnesses, WellLife Network plans to continue its mission to empower individuals to live dignified lives and achieve their goals with this new supportive mixed use apartment building.

The building, located at 80-97 Cypress Avenue, has 66 units, which are a combination of studio, one-bedroom, and two-bedroom apartments.

Forty of these units are reserved for the homeless, while the remaining 26 units are for individuals in the community who meet low-income eligibility criteria, or 60 percent of the area median income.

Sherry Tucker, CEO of WellLife Network, is saddened by the fact that over 25,000 applications were submitted for the 26 community units, revealing how much demand there is for affordable housing in New York.

The previous property at the site of 80-97 Cypress Avenue was a community eyesore for years.

“At WellLife, we work very hard to be good neighbors, wherever we go, and we are always interested in trying to improve the areas in any way we can,” she said. “We’d love to be an asset to the neighborhood and really try to help in any way we can to make it be the very best it can be, and we always want to be a part of the community in any way possible.”

On June 9, WellLife Network commemorated the official grand opening of the building with a ribbon cutting ceremony.

Local officials attended the event to compliment the project, including Ingrid Lewis-Martin, chief adviser to Mayor Eric Adams; Ahmed Tigani, deputy commissioner of NYC Department of Housing Preservation and Development; and New York City Councilman Robert Holden.

“WellLife, in partnership with the New York City Department of Housing, Preservation, and Development has created a model mixed-housing development for some of our most vulnerable residents in need of supportive services, as well as for New Yorkers who just need good and decent affordable housing,” Lewis-Martin said. “We strongly encourage other developers to ‘honor the call’ to create affordable housing with amenities in communities that systematically have been on the fringes. Kudos to WellLife and HPD for a job well done.”

Tucker said that WellLife’s proposal to open this apartment complex was approved unanimously by Community Board 5.

Walter Sanchez, chairman of CB5’s Land Use Committee, said that the board’s decision to approve was the right thing for the neighborhood.

“We know that every area has to do their part in supportive housing, and we think this fits in very well with us, so our board voted overwhelmingly to approve the project,” he said.
WellLife also held public forums to hear the community’s concerns—many of which they took into consideration when tweaking the specs of the project, such as potential traffic congestion and excessive height.

However, some neighbors on Cypress Avenue are skeptical of what changes the new apartment complex might bring to the community, especially with widespread concerns about the nearby men’s homeless shelter on Cooper Avenue, Cooper Rapid Rehousing Center.

“We’re not happy about this; it’s going to be a mess,” one neighbor, who requested to remain anonymous, said. “That’s why my landlord is selling this house and we’re leaving.”

Another neighbor, Yaffa Tamano, said that she’s also not in favor of the project because it’s out of character for the rest of the block, and might bring unwanted change to the neighborhood.

Councilman Robert Holden, who has openly criticized the Cooper homeless shelter in the past, emphasized that WellLife’s new affordable housing project is in no way comparable to it.

“This is actually a home for people; they’re going to stay there. This is not something like a shelter where they’re transient and they come and they have problems,” Holden said.
“This place actually supports and treats them … Some have mental health issues, some are just falling on hard times, and some are coming from shelters, but they will get their own apartment, which is great.”

Tucker said that the building has various amenities and services that will significantly improve the quality of life for residents, such as 24/7 front desk coverage, on-site support services, a laundry room, gym, and a deck that offers a perfect view of the city skyline.

She noted that the site just passed a final routine HPD inspection, and families could start moving in as early as this week.

“The Cypress Avenue residence helps WellLife achieve its ongoing vision to create income-eligible, supportive, and affordable mixed-use housing developments that offer a safe and nurturing environment where all tenants feel a sense of belonging to a larger community,” she said.

Editor’s Note: Walter Sanchez is the publisher of BQE Media. His recent remarks were made in his capacity as chairman of CB 5’s Land Use Committee.

Ridgewood/Glendale honors Veterans on Memorial Day

Residents of Ridgewood, Glendale, and neighboring communities showed up for the long awaited 84th annual Ridgewood/Glendale Memorial Day Parade on Monday.
Veterans, active military personnel, community groups, elected officials, and locals alike gathered to honor and remember the men and women who died in service to their country.

“Today, we remember those that gave their lives in service to this country. This is not the day to be barbecuing and going to sales, you can do that any time,” Russell Goeller, parade chairman and committee member, said.
“This is the day where everyone who had a loved one has been touched by loss in any of these great wars in places some of us haven’t even heard of ,” he continued. “We have to remember them.”

He honored the men in Marine Corps uniforms who led the parade, thanking them, and encouraging each individual in attendance to do the same.
The group also celebrated this year’s Grand Marshal, Paul J. Schottenhamel, who served in the Vietnam War, and is a member of the Joseph B. Garity Post No. 562, American Legion.

Assembly Candidate Brent O’Leary at the Glendale/Ridgewood Memorial Day Parade

Several local elected officials shared words of support and gratitude, including Congresswoman Grace Meng, Assemblywoman Cathy Nolan, Glenda Garcia, deputy commissioner at the NYC Department of Veterans Services, NY State Senator Joseph Addabbo, and City Councilman Robert Holden. State Assembly hopeful, Brent O’Leary, also made an appearance at the parade.

“Memorial Day is one of the most important days in American culture, as we celebrate the people who paid the ultimate sacrifice to enjoy the freedoms that our country gives,” O’Leary said. “My father was in the Navy in World War II, and thankfully he came home. But I know every day that even if you look at what’s happening in the Ukraine, if it wasn’t without these people who are willing to sacrifice, we would not have the country that we are in.”

Glendale Kiwanis marched in the annual Memorial Day Parade.

Ridgewood Property Owners Association at the parade.

US Marines marching in the parade.
(Photos by Jessica Meditz)

“Borough Boxing” brings fight night to St. John’s

People filled the Carnesecca Arena at St. John’s University on Saturday night, to watch and cheer as some of the toughest professional boxers from NYC stepped into the ring. Hosted by Joe DeGuardia’s Star Boxing, “Borough Boxing,” featured five back-to-back match-ups, including the main event between Woodhaven local Danny “El Gallo” Gonzalez (20-4-1 7 KO’s) and Brazilian welterweight Paulo Galdino (12-5 8 KO’s).

Danny “El Gallo” Gonzalez went the distance in an 8 round bout against Brazilian welterweight Paulo Galdino

Gonzalez came out the gate early, landing a flurry of punches, keeping Galdino unsteady on his feet. Gonzalez was looking to close the show early, but Galdino managed to survive the round. The thrilling action continued throughout the entire bout. Gonzalez appeared to have Galdino’s number several times throughout the match, picking his spot and unleashing strong bursts of jabs against the southpaw Galdino, who managed to hold his own through all eight rounds. The fight was a memorable one, as the two fighters went back and forth, exchanging impressive and brutal blows to the body of their opponent.

In the end, it all came down to the final bell, as ringside judges were left with a difficult decision to make. In the end, it was Galdino who pulled it off, winning in a razor-thin split decision upset right in Gonzalez’s own backyard.

Maureen “The Real Million Dollar Baby” Shea wins her bout.

Maureen “The Real Million Dollar Baby” Shea (30-2-1 13 KO’s) extended her win streak in a super bantamweight showdown against Calista “Cali” Silgado (19-14-1 13 KO’s), who showed remarkable resolve, trading blows and body shots with the heavy-handed Bronx-native. But in the end, it would be Shea’s superior boxing ability that would prove the difference, winning by unanimous decision. She is now poised to make a title run at 118-122 lbs.

The undercard matches were just as thrilling as the Bronx-based “The Nigerian Nightmare” Afunwa King (4-1 1 KO) won in the cross-borough matchup, besting Brooklyn-born and raised Kamron Humphrey (3-1 2 KO’s). King managed to knock down Humphrey in the second round, to go on to win in a unanimous decision.

Glendale’s own Mat “The Future” Castro wins his bout against Angelo Thompson

Glendale’s own Mat “The Future” Castro got hometown fans riled up in his match-up against Angelo Thompson (0-3), as they went the full 4-rounds in this super welterweight fight. Thompson kept Castro on his toes, but in the end, it was not enough to triumph over Castro’s boxing skills, which made all the difference. Castro won by unanimous decision.

The opening bout of the night got fans out of their seats to see NYPD officer Emmanuel Etienne (2-0 1 KO) face off against Tunde Fatiregun (0-2) from Elizabeth, NJ. The first two rounds were intense as both fighters switched up from the body to the head. However, in the third round, Fatiregun was deducted a point for two separate occasions where he pressed down on the head and held Etienne. In the end, the referee called the fight off for the same reason, giving Etienne the win by DQ in the fourth round.

“What an excellent night of boxing for the first-ever show in Carnesecca Arena history,” Joe DeGuardia, CEO of Star Boxing, said. “The fights emulated the grit and determination of the history and quality of Borough Boxing. Maureen Shea bit down against a tough opponent and got the job done. Paulo Galdino and Danny Gonzalez put on a thrilling fight for the fans, as did all combatants. Thank you to everyone involved in the show and the fans who came out to support their fighters and the show. We look forward to returning to St. John’s University and will announce our future events schedule soon.”

Afunwa King of The Bronx and Kamron Humphrey of Brooklyn step into the ring for an interborough match-up.

Pizza Dance to hold family day at Atlas Park

Org to raise funds for trade school scholarships

By Jessica Meditz

[email protected]

Founded in 1997 by Tony Modica, owner of Prima Pasta & Cafe in Howard Beach, the Pizza Dance Foundation prides itself on giving back to the community in various ways.

This Sunday, the foundation will host a family day at the Shops at Atlas Park from 2-6 p.m.

The event will take place in the beer garden area of Manor Oktoberfest, where there will be food, music, giveaways, henna tattoos, and face painting.

Guests will also be provided with entertainment for the afternoon, including the East Coast Classic Car Show, magic by Stephen Roberts, and music by Emilio and Kathy Leon featuring Modica and other musical guests.

Tony Modica, founder of Pizza Dance Foundation and owner of Prima Pasta in Howard Beach.

Local elected officials NYS Senator Joseph Addabbo, Assemblywoman Jenifer Rajkumar and Councilman Robert Holden are expected to attend the event to show their support.

Leon, administrator of the Pizza Dance Foundation, said the group aims to do at least three fundraisers per year for different community causes.

The family day at Atlas Park seeks to raise $2,500 for trade school scholarships and the Back to School Supplies Distribution in August, which they participate in annually.

“The basis of the foundation is to go from community to community and spread love, peace, and unity to everyone,” Leon said.

Being a professional singer herself, Leon said that a large part of their mission is to provide fun and entertainment to people in the community to bring joy to their lives.

“We just try to bring everyone together,” she continued. “I’ve gone everywhere, from community centers to nursing homes to perform, and it just makes people so much happier.”

Leon said that anyone who believes in the Pizza Dance Foundation’s mission and would like to get involved can contact her via email at [email protected], or by phone 1 (833) 422-8522.

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