History marked in Brooklyn Bridge Park
by Andrew Shilling
Jun 04, 2014 | 707 views | 0 0 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The Brooklyn Historical Society joins Brooklyn Bridge Park and Councilman Stephen Levin to unveil the first of the historical signs.
The Brooklyn Historical Society joins Brooklyn Bridge Park and Councilman Stephen Levin to unveil the first of the historical signs.
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Regina Myer, president of Brooklyn Bridge Park, discusses the new signs.
Regina Myer, president of Brooklyn Bridge Park, discusses the new signs.
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Brooklyn Bridge Park was only established four years ago, but the deep history at the corner of Old Fulton and Furman streets goes back centuries.

Now with historical markers and interpretive signage slated between both Pier One and Six and an accompanying website – brooklynwaterfronthistory.org – visitors and frequent park goers can now learn a wide range of facts and history about the Brooklyn waterfront.

Regina Myer, president of Brooklyn Bridge Park, said she has marveled at how quickly the park has grown since its inception just a few years ago, and now looks forward to the feedback following the installation of the new signs.

“This park was built on a legacy of creativity, activism and diversity and what better way to pay homage to this legacy than to share it with park visitors,” Myer said. “The signs, footnotes and website will add a layer of information for visitors, which will further enrich their experience of the park.”

The signs – designed by Open design studio - will also serve as a walking companion for an accompanying cell phone app.

Deborah Schwartz, president of the Brooklyn Historical Society, said the new initiative to spread the history of the park is something that is long-awaited and a crucial element to understanding the history of Brooklyn.

“From the Bohemian community in Brooklyn Heights, to the hardworking immigrant communities that emerged from the harbor to settle along Atlantic Avenue, the history of the Brooklyn waterfront is a collection of multifaceted, multicultural stories that helped shape the borough as we know it today,” Schwartz said.

The second phase of the historical sign installation will begin upon the completion of the Empire Stores, Tobacco Warehouse and the Main Street and John Street sections of the park.

Councilman Stephen Levin said he hopes children from the schools and neighborhoods throughout the borough will have a chance to engage in their own history through this outreach program.

“The Brooklyn waterfront in this area is a living history,” Levin said. “It’s really great that we’re doing this today, and acknowledging that history and keeping it alive.”

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