No sleep in Brooklyn
by Andrew Pavia
Nov 14, 2013 | 659 views | 0 0 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Roberto Gautier shows Councilman Stephen Levin a petition that was sent to  DOT.
Roberto Gautier shows Councilman Stephen Levin a petition that was sent to DOT.
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Construction on the Brooklyn Bridge taking place across the street from 140 Cadman Plaza West.
Construction on the Brooklyn Bridge taking place across the street from 140 Cadman Plaza West.
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Residents living near the Brooklyn Bridge are calling on the Department of Transportation to reduce the noise created by a nighttime construction project.

At a rally in in front of their building last week, residents of 140 Cadman Plaza West are complaining that noise from the equipment is keeping them up at night.

“It’s terrible,” said Roberto Gautier, president of the building's Peace & Quiet Committee. “My wife wakes up every morning with her heart pounding.”

The work has being going on for over two years, and is estimated to go on for at least another two. During the week, construction hours are from 11 p.m. until 6 a.m. On weekends, work is done from midnight until 7 a.m. on Saturday, and midnight until 9 a.m. on Sundays.

Gautier’s group sent a petition to DOT demanding it complete an environmental impact study and revise the noise mitigation plan. Residents of the building said they are in favor of the bridge being refurnished, but are unhappy about the noise.

“We cannot have so much noise that it causes our community to not only lose sleep, but seriously impact our health,” said Councilman Stephen Levin.

But a DOT spokesperson said the work is within the city's noise guidelines.

“This project operates within the 2007 NYC Noise Code and with a DEP-approved Noise Mitigation Plan for off-hour work,” said the spokesperson. “In close coordination with DEP, DOT has taken steps to reduce noise at the source by using smaller jackhammers with the most current mufflers, as well as deploying solar-powered equipment where possible.”

Levin disagreed with the assertion that the measures taken to mitigate noise are sufficient.

“What the city has come up with is absolutely and 100 percent insufficient,” he said. “In fact, it has no impact whatsoever.”

Dr. Arline Bronzaft, an environmental psychologist who lives at 140 Cadman Plaza West, stated in past studies she has found that children exposed to noise who are unable to get enough rest at night had difficulty in school.

“We’re not just talking about noise,” said Bronzaft. “It is not simply an annoyance. This has a health impact.”

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