Yankees want the best of both worlds
by John Jastremski
Jul 27, 2016 | 7720 views | 0 0 comments | 192 192 recommendations | email to a friend | print
After Sunday’s victory over the San Francisco Giants, the Yankees concluded their critical ten game home stand out of the All-Star Break with a record of 6-4.

A solid home stand when you consider the competition, but not enough of a statement to suggest all of a sudden this team was ready to make a serious move for a postseason spot.

The Yankees current outlook placed ownership and general manager Brian Cashman in a situation where you feel like the team is in absolute no man’s land.

With the 2016 Yankees you feel they’re maybe not good enough to be a legitimate contender, but not bad enough to back up the truck.

On Monday, the Yankees decided that they were ready to trade flame-throwing closer Arodlis Chapman to the Chicago Cubs for a package that was simply too good to refuse.

Sure, on the surface one would argue that the Yankees hurt their 2016 club by trading away one of the best relievers in baseball, however they still have Andrew Miller and Dellin Betances at the back end of the bullpen.

However, by trading Chapman to Chicago, the Yankees acquired two of the top prospects in the loaded Chicago Cubs minor league system, headlined by 19-year-old shortstop Gleyber Torres.

This is exactly the sort of trade the Yankees should be looking to make.

They were able to acquire a talented asset for very little due to Chapman’s off-the-field trouble, but a few months later you flip that talented asset for a bunch of pieces that could potentially help you down the road.

The deal, much like the one the Yankees made in January to acquire Chapman, is the definition of an absolute no-brainer.

Despite the fact that Chapman gave the Yankees, the most ridiculous triple threat you will ever see at the end of the game, it did not improve the product you saw on the field at Yankee Stadium.

The team’s record at the end of six innings was not much different than what you saw last season, and in bringing back swingman Adam Warren, who was traded away for Starlin Castro, the hope is that he can help fill the void.

Warren may help the 2016 team, but the purpose of this trade was obviously trying to help the Yankees for years to come.

The Yankees have been searching for the sort of impact players that have been coming through minor league system after minor league system around baseball.

It would be nice to see a player the caliber of Manny Machado, Mookie Betts or Carlos Correa come up through the minor league system and find their way to the Bronx wearing the Yankee pinstripes.

The hope is that somebody like Gleyber Torres could be the answer to the Yankees prayers in the years to come, or could potentially be a chip to move elsewhere.

After the trade of Chapman, many Yankee fans wonder if it is the beginning of a fire sale? Is Carlos Beltran or Andrew Miller soon to follow?

Not necessarily. The Yankees made it clear on Monday that the trade of Chapman was just too good to pass up and still made it clear that their objective was to still find a way into the postseason.

The Yankees would have no chance of doing so without the services of Beltran and Miller, their best hitter and pitcher respectively in 2016.

It may very well be the case that the Chapman trade is the only one the Yankees make here at the deadline of 2016.

I may not believe in the team being a legitimate postseason contender, but if the mindset is to remain relevant while trying to get younger at the same time, at least it was accomplished after making this deal.

At the very least, the Yankees are not jeopardizing their long term future to win in 2016.

Only time will tell if the Chapman trade is the beginning of a fire sale.

Considering the comments of ownership and the general manager, I wouldn’t be counting on one.

You can listen to me Thursday from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m., Saturday, Sunday & Monday from 2 to 6 a.m. & Tuesday from 1 to 6 a.m. on WFAN Sports Radio 660/101.9 FM.
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