Who's mayor of NYC? Depends on who you ask
Jul 20, 2021 | 2465 views | 0 0 comments | 307 307 recommendations | email to a friend | print
At this rate, why even waste the money holding a general election this November to decide who will be the next mayor of New York City?

Eric Adams was finally declared the winner of the Democratic Primary in the first citywide test of ranked-choice voting, edging out fellow candidates Kathryn Garcia and Maya Wiley. There was also a Republican Primary this year, which Guardian Angels founder Curtis Sliwa won.

He'll face off against Adams this November, although you wouldn't know it by the way Adams is acting.

Adams has been taking a victory lap since he was declared the winner and, if we're being honest, Sliwa has almost no shot at defeating Adams in the general election. That said, Adams is acting more like the next mayor of New York City than a candidate who still has an election to win later this year.

Heck, Adams isn't even acting like the next mayor of New York City, he's acting like THE mayor of New York City.

At the Brooklyn Democratic Party's annual dinner at Giando on the Water in Williamsburg, Adams boldly declared “I am the mayor” as the actual mayor, Bill de Blasio, stood behind him with an uncomfortable smile frozen on his face.

Adams was greeted by a call-and-response chant of “The champ is here!” led by the party chair, Assemblywoman Rodneyse Bichotte Hermelyn.

In case you missed it, we figured we would borrow (steal?) from the Post and quote verbatim a mayoral spokesperson on the incident, because it was a pretty funny response.

“Damn. Now it’s official, I guess,” the spokesperson said. “Everyone knows that you officially assume office if you declare you’re the mayor within 10 feet of the current mayor. How do you think [late Mayor] Abe Beame got the job?”

That's some sarcasm we can appreciate!

All of this is probably bringing Governor Andrew Cuomo a little bit of joy even after he was interviewed this past weekend by the Attorney General's office on allegation he made unwanted sexual advances to several staffers over the years.

Cuomo and de Blasio have been locked in a long-standing feud for years, especially on the governor's side, who never seems to miss an opportunity to attack or undermine the mayor. Some might say his preoccupation with sticking it to de Blasio sometimes comes at the expense of the general welfare of the residents of New York City.

Earlier in the same day as Adams' declaration, Cuomo appeared at an event with Adams and declared him the next mayor of New York City and said he was very excited to work the Democratic Primary winner, something he has never said about de Blasio since he was named the Democratic nominee in 2013, when he did say he was excited to work with him.

That relationship deteriorated quickly, so we'll see how long the love fest between Adams and Cuomo lasts after the January 1st inauguration.

And it's not just local politicians who are ready to accept Adams as the 110th mayor of the Big Apple. Shortly after his victory was official, President Joe Biden, no less, invited Adams to the White House to discuss the rise in gun violence. We're guessing Sliwa didn't get the same consideration.

Heck, the current mayor of New York City, who still has six months left in office, wasn't even invited to the Capitol pow-wow.

Speaking of the radio show host, all of this praise and attention for Adams is not sitting well with Sliwa. Sliwa said Adams is acting like a “dictator” and brought up the fact that he narrowly defeated Garcia in the primary, which he presumably believes improves his chances come November.

We don't suppose Adams is going to pay much attention to Sliwa, and presumably will not agree to many debates, if any. If he does, it should be much-watch TV, as Sliwa will have to take every chance he gets to attack Adams.

Sliwa probably won't be the next mayor, but maybe this campaign will help him boost his ratings!
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