Unsolved Queens murder renews debate on microstamping
by Andrew Pavia
Apr 24, 2013 | 3972 views | 8 8 comments | 15 15 recommendations | email to a friend | print
A year has passed since Theodore Greene was shot 21 times in front of a building in LeFrak City near the Horace Harding Expressway. But one of the bullet holes is still in the concrete barricade Greene jumped over in an attempt to reach safety.

He was rushed to nearby Elmhurst Hospital that night, where he would later die.

“I fight with anger all the time,” said Greene’s mother, 52-year-old Debra Greene. “Someone had to have seen something.”

It was roughly 5 a.m. on April 20, 2012, when Greene was returning home to LeFrak City from a night out at a Manhattan night club with friends. After they dropped him off on the corner, he found himself running from a hailstorm of bullets.

Wiping tears away Debra Geene said of the older of her two sons, “he had plans, he was a smart boy.”

Police still have no suspects or leads in the investigation. Last week, local elected officials called on local residents to come forward with any information that could help solve the case.

“It is up to the community to do everything it can to help the NYPD help catch the killer,” said Councilman Daniel Dromm. “By increasing the reward amount, we are sending a strong message that we are not giving up on our search.”

Dromm has already pledged $1,000 of his own money, while State Senator Jose Peralta has secured $500 from the Bogota Service Corporation and an anonymous donor is pledging another $5000.

The total reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of Greene’s killers is $24,000.

Elected officials also called on the state legislature to require microstamping, which creates a fingerprint-type etching into a bullet casing in order to trace a gun to the owner.

“We call upon the state legislature, in particular the senate Republicans, to pass microstamping,” said Peralta, who said he believes this crime would have been solved already had microstamping been in practice in New York.

Peralt said that while the gun, the individual and even the car were never found or identified, the bullet casings were found on the ground at the scene of the crime. For a minimal cost, according to Peralta, the NYPD could have traced its way back to the murder weapon’s owner.

“I want justice,” Ms. Greene concluded. “Closure and justice.”

Comments
(8)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
Ken J
|
April 25, 2013
Elected officials also called on the state legislature to require etablishment of CoBIS, which creates a fingerprint-type ballistics database in order to trace a gun to the owner.

“We call upon the state legislature, in particular the senate Republicans, to pass establishing CoBIS,” said Peralta, who said he believes this crime would have been solved already had the CoBIS database been in practice in New York.

In the above edited paragraph, replacing micostamping with the already proven massive failure and tax payer waste of money called CoBIS, does anyone really think the unproven microstamping technology would solve anything?

Remember, CoBIS never solved one single crime... that's why it went away.

Read more: Queens Ledger - Unsolved Queens murder renews debate on microstamping
Roger H
|
April 24, 2013
Just like cobis solved so many crimes
TheTruthMan
|
April 24, 2013
From the NYPD Daily Blotter April 22, 2012

A 26-year-old man was gunned down early Friday in Lefrak City, police said.

An unknown assailant shot Theodore Greene, 26, in the torso at about 5 a.m. outside the Forest Hills cooperative-housing development near the Horace Harding Expressway.

Greene, who had a record that included an arrest for criminal possession of stolen property, died at Elmhurst General Hospital.

Investigators said it was unclear what led to the violence.

Do you really think that criminals are going to follow the law. Turn on your brains and think for yourselves.
Common Sense
|
April 24, 2013
The only thing worse than doing nothing is doing something that creates a false sense of security. Microstamping would not have solved this crime so instead of wasting time and money coming up with these feel good ideas lets address the real problem... our rotting culture.
wigman
|
April 24, 2013
Another BS do-nothing, accomplish nothing proposal by gun-grabbers. You actually think people shooting others on a NYC street is going to have a registered handgun???? Yeah, right. Apparently the zillion NYC laws AREN'T WORKING.....
Up-State Guy
|
April 24, 2013
All a perp would need to do is throw a handful of spent cases from a firing range down at the crime scene.... Then the PD would have multiple suspects.... What about revolvers? Mirco-Stamping won't work.... You can also just file the numbers off of the firing pin.... Remember, Criminals don't follow LAWS!!!
MikeLI
|
April 24, 2013
Microstamping is an expensive technique with plenty of shortcomings. Check wikipedia.org for a list.

Clearly not a solution, but definitely a burden for legal gun owners - perfect for the Left to support.
maxzig
|
April 24, 2013
Thats the intent, to create another burden for gun owners. If it did lead them to the firearm, which chances are it won't, I'm sure they would just find that it was stolen from a registered owner. What the hell good would that do?