Liu talks business at chamber meet in LIC
by Andrew Pavia
Jul 24, 2013 | 629 views | 0 0 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Comptroller John Liu spoke at a Long Island City/Astoria Chamber of Commerce meeting.
Comptroller John Liu spoke at a Long Island City/Astoria Chamber of Commerce meeting.
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At a recent Long Island City/Astoria Chamber of Commerce meeting, New York City Comptroller and mayoral hopeful John Liu discussed the city's economic policy and how it affects small businesses.

One of the main issues Liu focused on was the tax breaks that big business receive. Instead of viewing it as a positive way to keep these job creators in the city, Liu said that it was a way for them to bait government officials by threatening to leave.

“I propose a number of changes, for example at the corporate tax level, I believe that we should stop subsidizing these big corporations,” he said. “Especially those who threaten to move to New Jersey or elsewhere. It’s time to start calling their bluff.”

Liu said even if a large company leaves, the city can attract a new corporation and still maintain job growth.

On a more local level, the comptroller said that there are too many violations that are causing small business owners to suffer.

“Lots of people talk about fines and excessive violations that have nothing to do with public safety or health,” he said. “It’s just to generate more money and then more money for the city, and that is something that obviously needs to be cut back.”

Teddy Peselis, a small business owner and president of the 30th Avenue Business Association, said the area wasn't just about entrepreneurs, but also other small businesses that provide jobs.

“We’re not just an incubator for entrepreneurs,” he said. “We hire the school children that are home during the summer and the actress that needs a waitressing job.”

Peselis wanted to know how the city could help those kind of small businesses, not just the businesses that are exploring new technology or generating new products.

Liu said small business owners know what needs to get done without the city “butting in.”

Liu explained that if the city stops subsidizing large corporations, than it can ease the pressure it puts on small businesses through taxes and fines.

“By reducing the ticket blitzes and by reducing the tax burden, small business will benefit,” said Liu.

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