LIC school shifts focus to the environment
by Andrew Pavia
Mar 13, 2013 | 772 views | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer, Yvonne Leimsider, Principal of I.S. 204, Richard Cherry, President of Community Environmental Center and Sangida Bagaun, student at I.S. 204.
Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer, Yvonne Leimsider, Principal of I.S. 204, Richard Cherry, President of Community Environmental Center and Sangida Bagaun, student at I.S. 204.
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Residents of Long Island City are shifting their focus to environmental sustainability.

The EcoHouse in Dutch Kills Playground across the street from I.S. 204 will teach the community how to live their lives in a more environmentally friendly way.

This mobile facility contains hands-on learning tools showing the difference between certain light fixtures, shower faucets and insulation.

I.S. 204 Principal Yvonne Leimsider said all of the school's classes use environmental consciousness as a theme.

“We knew that what we have been teaching our children for the last three years would just be validated by this project,” said Leimsider of the EcoHouse.

She said one student is already putting the knowledge to use, offering tips to their family as they search for a new, eco-conscious home.

Every class in I.S. 204 will tour the EcoHouse, and neighboring schools have been invited to participate as well. Members of the community are invited to the mobile house for a lesson in environmental conservation outside of school hours and on weekends.

“Living green in a global society is the ethos of the school,” said Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer, who said linking the EcoHouse with I.S. 204 seemed like a good fit.

Student Sangida Bangun said it's important for youth to comprehend the environmental impacts of their daily lives. Bangun is a member of I.S. 204's Green Team, which raises awareness about environmental issues.

“We learned lots of interesting things about conservation at home,” said Bangun of her visit to the EcoHouse, “including how low-flow shower heads save water and still feel great.”

Richard Cherry, president of the Community Environmental Center, said the goal of EcoHouse is to stress the importance of how a house works and where money is spent and energy wasted.

“We get worse and worse in our habits,” he said. “What this house is about is to teach young people and adults how a house works and how not to be wasteful.”

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