Activist looks to oust longtime Maspeth assemblywoman
by Andrew Shilling
Apr 03, 2014 | 689 views | 0 0 comments | 21 21 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Dmytro Fedkowskyj launches his campaign in front of Maspeth High School over the weekend.
Dmytro Fedkowskyj launches his campaign in front of Maspeth High School over the weekend.
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Fedkowskyj meets with residents at the campaign kickoff event over the weekend.
Fedkowskyj meets with residents at the campaign kickoff event over the weekend.
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Dozens of supporters gather with Fedkowskyj and his family at the school.
Dozens of supporters gather with Fedkowskyj and his family at the school.
slideshow
Middle Village native Dmytro Fedkowskyj, 46, announced his candidacy as a Democratic candidate in Assembly District 30, a seat currently occupied by Democratic Assemblywoman Margaret Markey, who is planning on running for re-election.

The former Panel for Education Policy (PEP) board member, and current member of Community Board 5, gathered in front of Maspeth High School with dozens of supporters, starting the kickoff of his “grassroots” campaign.

“I made my decision based on the hundreds of people that I have spoken to over the last few months that have said we need change in this district,” Fedkowskyj said in front of the school, located at 54-40 74th St. “I’ve gotten the support of hundreds of people just in the first few weeks of talking to people.”

With an early focus on education, the Grover Cleveland High School graduate and SUNY Empire State College alum promised to fight for more funding for public schools in the district, which covers Astoria, Maspeth, Middle Village, Long Island City and Woodside.

“We need more seats to relieve overcrowding and we need to extend yellow bus service in our district,” he said.

If elected, Fedkowskyj added that he plans to provide additional funding for green space initiatives, graffiti removal, and rail problems, as well as plans for encouraging job training and small business tax credits focusing on women-owned small businesses.

“They [constituents] don’t feel as though their voices are being heard in Albany,” he said. “Whether it has to do with small businesses, whether it has to do with public schools or whether it has to do with pedestrian safety, they don’t feel that they are being represented, and when they asked me to be their leader I said I absolutely will.”

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