G train riders prepare for service repairs
by Sarah Iannone
Apr 09, 2014 | 766 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Panel of elected officials at a G train town hall last week
Panel of elected officials at a G train town hall last week
slideshow
Comptroller Scott Stringer
Comptroller Scott Stringer
slideshow
Sen. Daniel Squadron and Assemblyman Joe Lentol
Sen. Daniel Squadron and Assemblyman Joe Lentol
slideshow
For the second summer in a row, transit is about to get a bit trickier for Greenpoint residents.

The G train will be down for five straight weeks due to a second round of Sandy-related repairs that the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) says need to be done.

The MTA is completing the repairs between Court Square in Long Island City to Nassau Avenue in Greenpoint from July 26 to September 1 when the agency says ridership is at it's lowest.

"We should be doing something about it," State Senator Daniel Squadron said to kick off a town hall with the MTA last week. “This is a closure that is at this point going to happen, there's nothing new about that but we can make the pain a whole lot less.”

Throughout the suspension, the MTA will be dispatching free shuttle buses every two to three minutes during the week and every five to eight minutes during the weekend from Court Square to Nassau Avenue and also to Lorimer Street.

In addition, the L and M trains will run more frequently during the rush hours, said Ally Bechtel of the MTA's Operations Planning Unit.

Assemblyman Joe Lentol brought up the alternate possibility that the MTA should consider ferry service to Manhattan.

"It's very important for people to get to work,” Lentol said. “You're going to be inconvenienced during the summer anyway and it would be nice on a summer morning to take a ferry over to Manhattan, wouldn't it?"

However, Lydia Downing of the NYC Economic Development Corporation (EDC) admitted that this might not work as the India Street Ferry landing was still down after it collapsed this winter.

The possibility of increases on the B-32 bus route from every 30 minutes to every 15 minutes during the G train closure was also brought up.

"Once we see increased ridership we will decrease headway," said the MTA's assistant director Andrew Inglesby in response to the question.

Many frustrated residents also brought up the addition of more cars on the train once it is back up and running. The G line has fewer cars than other subway lines.

“Can we use resources to go to four to six cars?” asked Comptroller Scott Stringer. “If we are ever going to do it, now is the time.”

Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet