QPTV shines light on mental illness
by Andrew Pavia
Dec 04, 2013 | 623 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
John Collins a QPTV producer and director who headed up the project accepting an award for the series “Understanding Mental Health.”
John Collins a QPTV producer and director who headed up the project accepting an award for the series “Understanding Mental Health.”
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Daniel Leone president and CEO of QPTV.
Daniel Leone president and CEO of QPTV.
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Still photo from the documentary series
Still photo from the documentary series
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In an attempt to eliminate the stigma attached to mental illness, Queens Public Television is airing a six-part series on the issues. “Understanding Mental Illness” goes into detail about the everyday lives of those living with a mental illness.

For over a year, QPTV complied roughly 120 hours of footage for the six-part series.

“A documentary is a different kind of animal than a scripted narrative feature,” said. “You don’t know what you’re going to experience when you go out there.”

The interviews took place at Creedmoor Psychiatric Center, Zucker Hillside Hospital, Transitional Services of New York, Pride of Judea and Clinic Nueva Esperanza.

“Working with people who are in various stages of mental illness was surprisingly easy,” he said. “People who are suffering from mental illness are generally kinder and more gentle than other people.”

This shows are already airing, and can be seen at various times throughout December on QPTV. The first two parts of the six-part series have been recognized for first place awards from the Alliance for Community Media.

The idea behind the series actually came from a different series on health issues QPTV did in the past.

“The process started because a couple years ago we did a series on healthcare in your neighborhood,” said Sandra Delson, chair of QPTV programing. “When we started to put that together, we realized there was enormous services for mental health issues and we really couldn’t include that because it was so large.”

, said that the first series on healthcare was beneficial because it focused on the technology of the industry, however there was one aspect missing.

“What we were lacking is that human story and we wanted to produce another series to see another side of folks who needed this care,” said Leone. “Some folks that you see in the series have been through many stages of care. What we tried to weave together was the idea of a progressive care.”

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